A Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence led by the University of Maryland

Through curricular and experiential learning, START educates, mentors and trains the next generation of national security scholars and practitioners.

Curriculum Development Grant


Curriculum Development Grant

The National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism emphasizes the importance of translating its investigators’ cutting-edge research on terrorism and responses to terrorism into increased education and training opportunities. As part of this effort, START periodically issues curriculum development grants.

The grant competition funds faculty members and advanced doctoral students affiliated with START to develop sets of materials that can be incorporated into new and existing courses by both the grant recipient and other members of the START community.

Priorities for START Curriculum Development Grants

Reflection of Cutting-Edge START Research. Curriculum units focus on START-supported research, with the goal of quickly bringing new research findings to the classroom.

Interactivity and Novel Approaches to Teaching. Curriculum units are highly interactive (for instance, an in-class simulation) and emphasize novel approaches to teaching and learning.

Interdisciplinarity. Curriculum units incorporate approaches from multiple academic disciplines and challenge students to engage in critical, cross-disciplinary discourse on problems and/or issues relevant to the study of terrorism and responses to terrorism. Scalability. Curriculum units are scalable to different education levels (e.g., K-12, undergraduate, graduate, executive education) and should be a self-contained unit that instructors can fit into a modular course structure.

Immediacy and Impact. Curriculum units address problems and issues of immediate relevance to national and international policy. As such, curriculum units support START’s mission to train and mentor the next generation of terrorism scholars and analysts, individuals who will be dedicated to research, teaching, and analysis on issues related to the formation and behavior of terrorists and terrorist groups as well as the impacts that the threat of terrorism and terrorist acts hold for individuals, groups, and societies.

Past Awards

    Victor Asal, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, State University of New York at Albany/R. Karl Rethemeyer, Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration, State University of New York at Albany/Bryan Haynes, Research Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton in collaboration with Kate Izsak, Education Director, START, University of Maryland/Jacqueline DeVore, Education Coordinator, START, University of Maryland, "Six-Week Online Simulation"

    Christine Bevc, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Colorado, "Networks and Preparedness"

    Bidisha Biswas, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Western Washington University, "Exploring and Analyzing the Global Terrorism Database"

    Bidisha Biswas, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Western Washington University, "Online Simulation Modeled on November 2008 Mumbai Attacks"

    Erica Chenoweth, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Wesleyan University, “The Origins of Counterterrorism and the Effectiveness of Counterterrorism Policies”   

    Shawn Flanigan, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Administration, San Diego State University, "Conducting Field Research Outside the United States and in Difficult-to-Access Communities"

    Shira Fishman, Faculty Research Associate, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, University of Maryland, “Understanding Terrorist Behavior through Red Team Analysis”   

    Anthony Lemieux, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Purchase College, SUNY, "Modular Approach to Radicalization and Terrorist Motivations"

    Jeffrey Lewis, Lecturer, Department of History, The Ohio State University, "Engaging and Countering the Social and Cultural Mechanisms Used by Organizations to Motivate Suicide Attackers"

    Christine Muller, PhD Student, Department of American Studies, University of Maryland, “The Notion that the World Changed on September 11”   

    Christine Muller, PhD Student, Department of American Studies, University of Maryland, "What Can Oral Histories Tell Us About September 11?"

    Brian Nussbaum, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Bridgewater State University, "Risk Management and Analytic Techniques"

    R. Karl Rethemeyer, Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration, State University of New York at Albany, “Social Network Analysis for Studying Terrorism”

 

Questions can be directed to education@start.umd.edu.