A Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence led by the University of Maryland

A consortium of researchers dedicated to improving the understanding of the human causes and consequences of terrorism

Remodeling Partner Capacity: Maximizing the Effectiveness of US Counterterrorism Security Assistance


Remodeling Partner Capacity: Maximizing the Effectiveness of US Counterterrorism Security Assistance

Abstract: 

Since the September 11, 2001, attacks, the U.S. government (USG) has used security assistance programs with partner nations to advance its counterterrorism (CT) objectives. These programs serve two main purposes: first, to build the capacity of partners, who are best positioned to address local security and governance challenges; and second, to incentivize actions in these areas and others that advance U.S. counterterrorism interests. The rationale underpinning this approach is that partners are not only best positioned to address certain security challenges, but also that burden sharing is essential if the United States is to avoid the type of overreach that can dilute its political and military power. Thus, these programs, although expensive, are intended to defray costs away from the United States, which learned from the Iraq and Afghanistan experiences that a counterterrorism strategy centered on a heavy American footprint is costly and politically unsustainable.

Publication Information

Full Citation: 

Goldenberg, Ilan, Alice Hunt Friend, Stephen Tankel, and Nicholas A. Heras. 2016. "Remodeling Partner Capacity: Maximizing the Effectiveness of US Counterterrorism Security Assistance." Center for a New American Security (November). http://files.cnas.org.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/CNAS-Report-RemodelingPartnerCapacity-Final.pdf

Publication URL: 
Visit Website

Additional Info

Research Area: 
Regions: