A Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence led by the University of Maryland

START fosters a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment to create a team to meet the needs of the homeland security enterprise and train the next generation of scholars and practitioners. 

Internships


Internships

START offers unpaid internships year round on a variety of research projects and teams. During the course of their internship, participants are exposed to the most up-to-date theories, methods and information related to the study of terrorism. They are versed in the critical questions tackled by homeland security practitioners, policy makers and researchers, and are mentored in a professional environment geared toward student success. The program is designed to prepare the next generation of homeland security scholars and practitioners through real-world research experience.

Virtual Information Sessions
Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. EST Online
Thursday, Oct. 25 at 1 p.m. EST Online

START’s internship program is open to undergraduate and graduate students (as well as some recent graduates) in any related discipline from any institution. Each internship lasts for one term. Participants work at least 10 hours/week during the fall and spring semesters and 20 hours/week during the summer. Our internships can be undertaken for academic credit, and this is highly encouraged.  Interns participate in a program of enrichment and career development opportunities. All interns are required to work onsite with their research project staff. Because interns work directly with our researchers and staff on current research projects, the internship positions vary depending on our research portfolio.

Please review our Frequently Asked Questions page for answers to our most popular questions. For additional questions, contact internships@start.umd.edu.

   

 

Internship Listingsort descending Internship Description Deadline Semester
Using Language Analysis to Improve Bot Detection - Spring 2019

START is excited to be collaborating with the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) to offer the following project as part of our program. CASL serves as the premier strategic research partner for the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), solving the most critical and challenging language problems. CASL and its IC partners are working to identify bots and other inauthentic users by looking at the linguistic features of the messages. CASL is seeking up to two interns to aid in this project.  

Learn More
November 11, 2018
Spring 2019
Using Social Media Behavior to Identify Malign Actors: Data Collection and Annotation for Russian and Chinese Social Media - Spring 2019

START is excited to be collaborating with the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) to offer the following project as part of our program.  CASL serves as the premier strategic research partner for the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), solving the most critical and challenging language problems. CASL and its IC partners are working to develop corpora of social media in Russian and Chinese to facilitate the computational identification of personality and, hence, the identification of malign actors. CASL is seeking up to four interns to aid in this project. 

Learn More
November 11, 2018
Spring 2019
Virtual / Augmented Reality for Language Learning - Spring 2019

START is excited to be collaborating with the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) to offer the following project as part of our program.  CASL serves as the premier strategic research partner for the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), solving the most critical and challenging language problems.

Learn More
November 11, 2018
Spring 2019
With All Due Respect - Spring 2019

START is excited to be collaborating with the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) to offer the following project as part of our program.  CASL serves as the premier strategic research partner for the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), solving the most critical and challenging language problems. 

Learn More
November 11, 2018
Spring 2019

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