Incident Summary:

09/29/2005: Approximately 63 people were killed and another 85 injured in coordinated suicide attacks in the town of Balad, Iraq. Unidentified perpetrators blew up three pick up trucks packed with explosives in succession in crowded areas of the town within one hour of each other. The first bomb exploded at a crowded vegetable market. The second device blew up at Moat Gate near a Shi i mosque, while the third bomb blast occurred on Bank Street. No group claimed responsibility for the bombings.

GTD ID:
200509290001

When:
2005-09-29

Country:
Iraq

Region:
Middle East & North Africa

Province/administrative
region/u.s. state:

Saladin

City:
Balad

Attack Information
Type of Attack (more) Bombing/Explosion
Successful Attack? (more) Yes
Target Information (more)
Target Type: Private Citizens & Property
Name of Entity Unknown
Specific Description Unknown
Nationality of Target Iraq
Additional Information
Hostages No
Property Damage Unknown
Extent of Property Damage Unknown
Value of Property Damage Unknown
Weapon Information
Type Sub-type
Explosives/Bombs/Dynamite Vehicle
Additional Information
Suicide Attack?Yes
Part of Multiple Incident?No
Criterion 1 (more) Yes
Criterion 2 (more) Yes
Criterion 3 (more) Yes
Doubt Terrorism Proper (more) No
Perpetrator Group Information
Group Name Claimed Responsibility
Unknown No
Perpetrator Statistics
Number of Perpetrators Unknown
Number of Captured Perpetrators 0
Casualty Information
Total Number of Casualties 65 Fatalities / 70 Injured
Total Number of Fatalities 65
Number of U.S. Fatalities 0
Number of Perpetrator Fatalities 3
Total Number of Injured 70
Number of U.S. Injured 0
Number of Perpetrators Injured 0
Sources
Jackie Spinner, “Car Bombs Kill 63 In Town in N. Iraq; In Separate Attack, Five U.S. Soldiers Are Killed by Roadside Bomb in Ramadi,” The Washington Post, September 30, 2005.
Barry Wigmore, “65 Dead in Suicide Car Blasts,” The Daily Mail, September 30, 2005.
Robert F. Worth, “3 Truck Bombs Kill at least 62 in Iraqi Town,” The New York Times, September 30, 2005.