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The Impact of a Program of Prejudice-Reduction Seminars in South Africa


The Impact of a Program of Prejudice-Reduction Seminars in South Africa

Abstract: 
The influence of weekend-long prejudice-reduction seminars on attitudes, knowledge, and behavioral expectations of South African student leaders was assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Pre–post comparisons indicated increases in perceived stereotyping-caused suffering, ease of committing cross-cultural mistakes, and comfort with approaching racially diverse strangers. The seminars did not reduce essentialist thinking, nor the in-group favoritism found with measures of group identification and comfort approaching strangers. Similarly, they did not affect summary measures of stereotype understanding, perceived inter- or intra-group heterogeneity, preferred model of interethnic relations, nor attitudes toward affirmative action. Despite limited evidence of seminar impact, participants evaluated the seminars highly. Qualitative results suggest that opportunities to address racially based misperception of self and in-group were particularly valued.

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Full Citation: 

McCool Jr., M. Alan, and Fanie Du Toit, Christopher R. Petty, Clark McCauley. 2006. "The Impact of a Program of Prejudice-Reduction Seminars in South Africa." Journal of Applied Social Psychology (March): 586-613. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0021-9029.2006.0002
 

START Author(s): 
Clark McCauley
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