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Process Matters: Conflict and Cooperation in Sequential Government-Dissident Interactions


Process Matters: Conflict and Cooperation in Sequential Government-Dissident Interactions

Abstract: 

Competing hypotheses on the relationship between government and dissident behavior emerge from both formal and empirical models. Yet, the current literature lacks a comprehensive theoretical account of such contradictory effects. This study develops a theory to account for a large number of competing hypotheses within a single framework. The theory explains various government and dissident tactical choices over the course of an internal political struggle by focusing on leaders, their motivations, and the link between their motivations and actions. The theory gives rise to a process model of sequential government-dissident interactions that is used to test several implied hypotheses. Empirical sequential time-series models of government and dissident behavior find support for most of the theory's implied hypotheses in Israel (1979–2002) and Afghanistan (1990–99).

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Full Citation: 

Shellman, Stephen. 2006. "Process Matters: Conflict and Cooperation in Sequential Government-Dissident Interactions." Security Studies (October): 563-599. http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a772096517
 

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