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The Framing of Atrocities: Documenting and Exploring Wide Variation in Aversion to Germans and German-Related Activities Among Holocaust Survivors


The Framing of Atrocities: Documenting and Exploring Wide Variation in Aversion to Germans and German-Related Activities Among Holocaust Survivors

Abstract: 

Interviews with 29 Holocaust survivors indicate wide variation in degree of aversion to Germans and activities associated with Germany. For some survivors, aversion is limited to those closest to the Nazi perpetrators; for others aversion includes anyone with German ancestry and any situation or product linked to contemporary Germany. This wide range of aversion following horrific experiences is not easily explained by known psychological mechanisms, and has important implications for understanding and ameliorating ethnopolitical conflict. Possible sources of variation in aversion are explored with measures of personality differences and differences in Holocaust experience. Results indicate that degree of trauma during the Holocaust is not significantly related to aversion, and that strong predictors of aversion are degree of blame of Germans not directly involved in the Holocaust, religiosity, and German origin. Aversion to Germans is strongly related to aversion to contemporary Arabs and Muslims. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Publication Information

Full Citation: 

McCauley, Clark, and Lina Cherfas, Adam Cohen, Amelie Davidson. 2006. "The Framing of Atrocities: Documenting and Exploring Wide Variation in Aversion to Germans and German-Related Activities Among Holocaust Survivors." Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace and Psychology (January): 65-80. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15327949pac1201_5#preview

START Author(s): 
Clark McCauley
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