A Department of Homeland Security Emeritus Center of Excellence led by the University of Maryland

START Hosts "Framing Counterterrorism: Comparing Perspectives and Goals" at National Press Club in Washington DC


START Hosts "Framing Counterterrorism: Comparing Perspectives and Goals" at National Press Club in Washington DC

Date: 
Friday, November 3, 2006

FRAMING COUNTERTERRORISM: COMPARING PERSPECTIVES AND GOALS As highlighted in recent reports from the US intelligence community, there are questions regarding the impact of current counterterrorism strategies and tactics, including whether these efforts could have the unintended consequence of fomenting new terrorist movements. The National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) is sponsoring this event to explore in more detail the different frameworks used to shape counterterrorism strategies. Panelists will discuss the implications of framing counterterrorism efforts alternatively as:

  • a global war,
  • an epidemic to be contained,
  • a law-enforcement operation, or
  • an effort to improve inter-group relations.

The panel is comprised of experts in the fields of political science, social psychology, psychiatry, and neuropsychiatry. Panelists will consider the promise and pitfalls of these different counterterrorism frameworks and will provide insights into how these frames impact policy decisions and assessment.

Event Details:

WHO: Panelists: Martha Crenshaw, Wesleyan University Clark McCauley, University of Pennsylvania Jerrold Post, The George Washington University Jeff Victoroff, University of Southern California Moderator: Arie Kruglanski, University of Maryland

WHEN: Tuesday, November 28th 9:00am through 11 WHERE: National Press Club 529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor, Washington DC

RSVP: Colleen Bayus: 301 405 6600 or infostart@start.umd.edu

This event is being sponsored by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). START is a U.S. Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence, based at the University at the University of Maryland. START's mission is to harness the methods and resources of the social and behavioral sciences towards a better understanding of the formation and dynamics of terrorist groups and the social and psychological impacts of terrorism. More information is available at www.start.umd.edu/start. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations presented at this event are those of the panelists and do not necessarily reflect views of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.